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oomkzine:

Guerrilla Girls Interview (2014)
By Aurella Yussuf, originally appeared in OOMK issue 2.
How did you come up with the initial poster campaign? 
Twenty-eight years ago, we got the idea to put up a couple of posters on the streets of New York City about the state of women artists in the New York Art world. It wasn’t a pretty picture. But we had a new idea about how to construct political art — to twist an issue around and present it in a way that hadn’t been seen before. The Guerrilla Girls were born: an anonymous group of artists who wear gorilla masks in public and take the names of dead women artists as pseudonyms. Who knew that our work would cause all hell to break loose? Who knew it would cause a crisis of conscience about diversity in the art world, something museums, collectors and critics had denied for a long time. Now, it’s a no brainer…. you can’t tell the story of a culture without all the voices in it. We also take on Hollywood, politics and pop culture.
What kind of response did you get from the art world, and also the general public?
Our strategy worked. Lots of people in the art world were pissed at us, but some of them changed their bad behaviour when we showed them how discriminatory they had been. Lots of other people in the art world were thrilled that someone was standing up to the entrenched, corrupt system. 
As for the general public, we are still pretty much under the radar, but our influence is growing all the time. The best part; we get thousands of emails every year from people all over the world, age 8 to 80, telling us they use our work as a model for doing their own crazy kind of activism.
What are the differences between some of the challenges the group faced in the early days compared with today?
We used to be called a bunch of complaining bitches. Now they call us a bunch of creative, complaining bitches.
How has the art world changed since you highlighted these issues of racial and gender inequality?
It is very difficult to make it in any creative field, no matter who you are. That said, it is much harder for women and artists of color. Most art schools and university art departments have at least 60% female students, but most contemporary art museums have less than 20% women in their collections.
Then there is the art world and the art market, which are full of poseurs, snobs, insider traders, and crooks. The art market is the playground of the 1%. And, it’s pretty much unregulated. In fact, it has been described as the 4th largest black market in the world – after drugs, guns and diamonds.
How has your approach changed over the years? i.e. new media, new targets for criticism
Our targets haven’t changed, but we are able to do big street posters and billboards now, and we do them all over the world. Our latest was in London in April and our next one will be in Bilbao, Spain in October. We also participate in exhibitions, where we criticize museums right on their own walls. And we do performances and workshops where we help participants craft activist campaigns about issues they care about. 
How can you prevent a cause such as this from being seen as a fad or from being commodified?
We can’t control how we are perceived. We just try to do one thing at a time. If it works, we do another. If it doesn’t we do another anyway. We are a bunch of artists, and we’ve never been systematic, or wasted a lot of time talking about what we should do.
What advice would you have for young artists and activists today, in particular women & P.O.C?
To artists we say: we wish you success in the art world, but never forget that the system sucks and the art market and celebrity culture make everyone but the superstars feel like failures. You must speak out against art world discrimination and corruption.
To activists we say: don’t worry that you can’t change everything. Just keep trying. We promise that over time your activism will really add up to something. 
What does the word feminist mean to you? 
We think everyone should use the F word – Feminism. It’s outrageous that so many people who believe in the tenets of feminism — human rights including education for women worldwide, reproductive rights, freedom from sexual abuse and exploitation — still stop short of calling themselves feminists. Civil rights, women’s rights, lesbian, gay and trans rights are the great human rights movements of our time. Feminism has been demonized for so long in society and the media that it doesn’t get the respect it deserves, but it’s changed the world, revolutionized human thought and given many women lives their great grandmothers could never have imagined. Even the most repressive nations in the worlds have feminists, bravely speaking up or quietly working for women.
The Guerrilla Girls are part of the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, now until February, 2015

oomkzine:

Guerrilla Girls Interview (2014)

By Aurella Yussuf, originally appeared in OOMK issue 2.

How did you come up with the initial poster campaign?

Twenty-eight years ago, we got the idea to put up a couple of posters on the streets of New York City about the state of women artists in the New York Art world. It wasn’t a pretty picture. But we had a new idea about how to construct political art — to twist an issue around and present it in a way that hadn’t been seen before. The Guerrilla Girls were born: an anonymous group of artists who wear gorilla masks in public and take the names of dead women artists as pseudonyms. Who knew that our work would cause all hell to break loose? Who knew it would cause a crisis of conscience about diversity in the art world, something museums, collectors and critics had denied for a long time. Now, it’s a no brainer…. you can’t tell the story of a culture without all the voices in it. We also take on Hollywood, politics and pop culture.

What kind of response did you get from the art world, and also the general public?

Our strategy worked. Lots of people in the art world were pissed at us, but some of them changed their bad behaviour when we showed them how discriminatory they had been. Lots of other people in the art world were thrilled that someone was standing up to the entrenched, corrupt system.

As for the general public, we are still pretty much under the radar, but our influence is growing all the time. The best part; we get thousands of emails every year from people all over the world, age 8 to 80, telling us they use our work as a model for doing their own crazy kind of activism.

What are the differences between some of the challenges the group faced in the early days compared with today?

We used to be called a bunch of complaining bitches. Now they call us a bunch of creative, complaining bitches.

How has the art world changed since you highlighted these issues of racial and gender inequality?

It is very difficult to make it in any creative field, no matter who you are. That said, it is much harder for women and artists of color. Most art schools and university art departments have at least 60% female students, but most contemporary art museums have less than 20% women in their collections.

Then there is the art world and the art market, which are full of poseurs, snobs, insider traders, and crooks. The art market is the playground of the 1%. And, it’s pretty much unregulated. In fact, it has been described as the 4th largest black market in the world – after drugs, guns and diamonds.

How has your approach changed over the years? i.e. new media, new targets for criticism

Our targets haven’t changed, but we are able to do big street posters and billboards now, and we do them all over the world. Our latest was in London in April and our next one will be in Bilbao, Spain in October. We also participate in exhibitions, where we criticize museums right on their own walls. And we do performances and workshops where we help participants craft activist campaigns about issues they care about.

How can you prevent a cause such as this from being seen as a fad or from being commodified?

We can’t control how we are perceived. We just try to do one thing at a time. If it works, we do another. If it doesn’t we do another anyway. We are a bunch of artists, and we’ve never been systematic, or wasted a lot of time talking about what we should do.

What advice would you have for young artists and activists today, in particular women & P.O.C?

To artists we say: we wish you success in the art world, but never forget that the system sucks and the art market and celebrity culture make everyone but the superstars feel like failures. You must speak out against art world discrimination and corruption.

To activists we say: don’t worry that you can’t change everything. Just keep trying. We promise that over time your activism will really add up to something.

What does the word feminist mean to you?

We think everyone should use the F word – Feminism. It’s outrageous that so many people who believe in the tenets of feminism — human rights including education for women worldwide, reproductive rights, freedom from sexual abuse and exploitation — still stop short of calling themselves feminists. Civil rights, women’s rights, lesbian, gay and trans rights are the great human rights movements of our time. Feminism has been demonized for so long in society and the media that it doesn’t get the respect it deserves, but it’s changed the world, revolutionized human thought and given many women lives their great grandmothers could never have imagined. Even the most repressive nations in the worlds have feminists, bravely speaking up or quietly working for women.

The Guerrilla Girls are part of the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, now until February, 2015

literalporn:

the one fun thing about dating white guys is going to white people shit.

i got taken to a white people concert the other night. white people concerts are the best because, not only do you get to observe them in their natural habitat, you get to see white people dancing. 

the band was called xavier rudd. the whole act’s vibe was white people with dreadlocks walkin around public barefoot with denim vests on. apparently these dudes are australian (strayan) and one of them lived with the aborigines  which i guess is supposed to lend him some sort of hippie tribe cred (kinda like street/rap cred but for white people with dreads).

as soon as i told my date this lead guy is the white wannabe Bob Marley, the dude goes into a Bob Marley cover. listening to a barefoot white man with a dirty ponytail singing about being stolen from africa was the highlight of my night. no i lied, the highlight was when he blew two giant wooden dildos called a didgeridoo and talked about mother earth while the crowd waved peace signs in the air and chanted heyy ahhh ohhh heyyy ahh ohhh heyyy ahh ohh.

My alone feels so good, I’ll only have you if you’re sweeter than my solitude.
Warsan Shire (via warsanshire)
artslang:


AFRICANS YOU SHOULD KNOW: Seydou Keita
Seydou Keïta was born in 1921 in Bamako, although the exact date is unknown. He was the oldest in a family of five children. His father Bâ Tièkòró and his uncle Tièmòkò were furniture makers.
Keïta developed an interest in photography when his uncle gave him a Kodak Brownie with a film with eight shots in 1935, after returning from a trip to Senegal. 
In the beginning Keïta worked as both a carpenter and photographer, taking first portraits of his family and friends, later of people in the neighborhood. 
He learned photography and how to develop from Pierre Garnier, a French photographic supply store owner, and from Mountaga Traoré, his mentor. In 1948 he set up his first studio in the family house in Bamako-Koura behind the main prison.

African music makers.

artslang:

AFRICANS YOU SHOULD KNOW: Seydou Keita

Seydou Keïta was born in 1921 in Bamako, although the exact date is unknown. He was the oldest in a family of five children. His father Bâ Tièkòró and his uncle Tièmòkò were furniture makers.

Keïta developed an interest in photography when his uncle gave him a Kodak Brownie with a film with eight shots in 1935, after returning from a trip to Senegal.

In the beginning Keïta worked as both a carpenter and photographer, taking first portraits of his family and friends, later of people in the neighborhood.

He learned photography and how to develop from Pierre Garnier, a French photographic supply store owner, and from Mountaga Traoré, his mentor. In 1948 he set up his first studio in the family house in Bamako-Koura behind the main prison.

African music makers.

anotherafrica:

SARTORIAL LOOKS #9 PORTRAITURE | Jurgen Schadenburg. Henry Nxumalo, The 50’s in Black & White. 
 Jurgen Schadeberg was born in Berlin in 1931 and, while still in his teens, worked as an apprentice photographer for a German Press Agency in Hamburg. In 1950 he emigrated to South Africa and became Chief Photographer, Picture Editor and Art Director on Drum Magazine.
It was during this time that Jurgen photographed pivotal moments in the lives of South Africans in the fifties. These photographs represent the life and struggle of South Africans during Apartheid and include important figures in South Africa’s history such as Nelson Mandela, Moroka, Walter Sisulu, Yusuf Dadoo, Huddleston and many others who have been documented at key moments such as during The Defiance Campaign of 1952, The Treason Trial of 1958, The Sophiatown Removals and the Sharpeville Funeral in 1960.
His images also capture key personalities and events in the jazz and literary world such as the Sophiatown jazz scene with Dolly Rathebe, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela and Kippie Moeketsi.

anotherafrica:

SARTORIAL LOOKS #9
PORTRAITURE | Jurgen Schadenburg. Henry Nxumalo, The 50’s in Black & White.

Jurgen Schadeberg was born in Berlin in 1931 and, while still in his teens, worked as an apprentice photographer for a German Press Agency in Hamburg. In 1950 he emigrated to South Africa and became Chief Photographer, Picture Editor and Art Director on Drum Magazine.

It was during this time that Jurgen photographed pivotal moments in the lives of South Africans in the fifties. These photographs represent the life and struggle of South Africans during Apartheid and include important figures in South Africa’s history such as Nelson Mandela, Moroka, Walter Sisulu, Yusuf Dadoo, Huddleston and many others who have been documented at key moments such as during The Defiance Campaign of 1952, The Treason Trial of 1958, The Sophiatown Removals and the Sharpeville Funeral in 1960.

His images also capture key personalities and events in the jazz and literary world such as the Sophiatown jazz scene with Dolly Rathebe, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela and Kippie Moeketsi.

girlsgetbusyzine:

We now have FEMINIST hats on the webshop - designed by the Beanie Babes especially for Girls Get Busy ♥
AVAILABLE TO BUY HERE WITH INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING

WANT

girlsgetbusyzine:

We now have FEMINIST hats on the webshop - designed by the Beanie Babes especially for Girls Get Busy 

AVAILABLE TO BUY HERE WITH INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING

WANT