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literalporn:

the one fun thing about dating white guys is going to white people shit.

i got taken to a white people concert the other night. white people concerts are the best because, not only do you get to observe them in their natural habitat, you get to see white people dancing. 

the band was called xavier rudd. the whole act’s vibe was white people with dreadlocks walkin around public barefoot with denim vests on. apparently these dudes are australian (strayan) and one of them lived with the aborigines  which i guess is supposed to lend him some sort of hippie tribe cred (kinda like street/rap cred but for white people with dreads).

as soon as i told my date this lead guy is the white wannabe Bob Marley, the dude goes into a Bob Marley cover. listening to a barefoot white man with a dirty ponytail singing about being stolen from africa was the highlight of my night. no i lied, the highlight was when he blew two giant wooden dildos called a didgeridoo and talked about mother earth while the crowd waved peace signs in the air and chanted heyy ahhh ohhh heyyy ahh ohhh heyyy ahh ohh.

My alone feels so good, I’ll only have you if you’re sweeter than my solitude.
Warsan Shire (via warsanshire)
artslang:


AFRICANS YOU SHOULD KNOW: Seydou Keita
Seydou Keïta was born in 1921 in Bamako, although the exact date is unknown. He was the oldest in a family of five children. His father Bâ Tièkòró and his uncle Tièmòkò were furniture makers.
Keïta developed an interest in photography when his uncle gave him a Kodak Brownie with a film with eight shots in 1935, after returning from a trip to Senegal. 
In the beginning Keïta worked as both a carpenter and photographer, taking first portraits of his family and friends, later of people in the neighborhood. 
He learned photography and how to develop from Pierre Garnier, a French photographic supply store owner, and from Mountaga Traoré, his mentor. In 1948 he set up his first studio in the family house in Bamako-Koura behind the main prison.

African music makers.

artslang:

AFRICANS YOU SHOULD KNOW: Seydou Keita

Seydou Keïta was born in 1921 in Bamako, although the exact date is unknown. He was the oldest in a family of five children. His father Bâ Tièkòró and his uncle Tièmòkò were furniture makers.

Keïta developed an interest in photography when his uncle gave him a Kodak Brownie with a film with eight shots in 1935, after returning from a trip to Senegal.

In the beginning Keïta worked as both a carpenter and photographer, taking first portraits of his family and friends, later of people in the neighborhood.

He learned photography and how to develop from Pierre Garnier, a French photographic supply store owner, and from Mountaga Traoré, his mentor. In 1948 he set up his first studio in the family house in Bamako-Koura behind the main prison.

African music makers.

anotherafrica:

SARTORIAL LOOKS #9 PORTRAITURE | Jurgen Schadenburg. Henry Nxumalo, The 50’s in Black & White. 
 Jurgen Schadeberg was born in Berlin in 1931 and, while still in his teens, worked as an apprentice photographer for a German Press Agency in Hamburg. In 1950 he emigrated to South Africa and became Chief Photographer, Picture Editor and Art Director on Drum Magazine.
It was during this time that Jurgen photographed pivotal moments in the lives of South Africans in the fifties. These photographs represent the life and struggle of South Africans during Apartheid and include important figures in South Africa’s history such as Nelson Mandela, Moroka, Walter Sisulu, Yusuf Dadoo, Huddleston and many others who have been documented at key moments such as during The Defiance Campaign of 1952, The Treason Trial of 1958, The Sophiatown Removals and the Sharpeville Funeral in 1960.
His images also capture key personalities and events in the jazz and literary world such as the Sophiatown jazz scene with Dolly Rathebe, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela and Kippie Moeketsi.

anotherafrica:

SARTORIAL LOOKS #9
PORTRAITURE | Jurgen Schadenburg. Henry Nxumalo, The 50’s in Black & White.

Jurgen Schadeberg was born in Berlin in 1931 and, while still in his teens, worked as an apprentice photographer for a German Press Agency in Hamburg. In 1950 he emigrated to South Africa and became Chief Photographer, Picture Editor and Art Director on Drum Magazine.

It was during this time that Jurgen photographed pivotal moments in the lives of South Africans in the fifties. These photographs represent the life and struggle of South Africans during Apartheid and include important figures in South Africa’s history such as Nelson Mandela, Moroka, Walter Sisulu, Yusuf Dadoo, Huddleston and many others who have been documented at key moments such as during The Defiance Campaign of 1952, The Treason Trial of 1958, The Sophiatown Removals and the Sharpeville Funeral in 1960.

His images also capture key personalities and events in the jazz and literary world such as the Sophiatown jazz scene with Dolly Rathebe, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela and Kippie Moeketsi.

girlsgetbusyzine:

We now have FEMINIST hats on the webshop - designed by the Beanie Babes especially for Girls Get Busy ♥
AVAILABLE TO BUY HERE WITH INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING

WANT

girlsgetbusyzine:

We now have FEMINIST hats on the webshop - designed by the Beanie Babes especially for Girls Get Busy 

AVAILABLE TO BUY HERE WITH INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING

WANT

dormantgenius:

skummiest:

:(

The clip of when they played “Hypnotize” and ALL of Brooklyn went crazy is one of my favorite!

dormantgenius:

skummiest:

:(

The clip of when they played “Hypnotize” and ALL of Brooklyn went crazy is one of my favorite!